As you may know, every month this year I’m going to pick something to focus on, depending on what I feel I need during that particular month. For January, it was a no-brainer. Slow Down.

The past few months have been busy, both at home and at work, and I realized that most of my life these days has been a blur. Well, I intend to change that going into the New Year.  Sure, I want to do EVERYTHING but I also want to savor time. Enjoy the slowness. Stop racing around.

One of the things I’ve given up while trying to be more productive is reading fiction. I used to read everything I could get my hands on but these days I mainly read nonfiction since I host the nonfiction book club at work. Or, I watch a lot of movies at home, since I can paint at the same time!

But you can lose yourself in a good book. You can travel to distant lands, meet fascinating people, solve mysteries, laugh, cry, love, hate. All of this can happen in a good book. You also slow down time – the world might rush by but within those pages you have no appointments to keep, bills to pay, or concerns to face. I’ve been avoiding good stories because I feel I’m just too busy to sit down and read. I think, however, that when you FEEL as if you’re too busy, then that’s when you most need to take that time to read. Even if it’s a few pages every night. TVs are loud and too stimulating. Books are quiet – in our world, we NEED quiet – and, by forcing you to rely on your imagination, great creativity boosters as well.

This year, I resolved to read more for pleasure and, as fate would have it, over the holidays I got an advanced copy of Swimming Lessons by Claire Fuller (Tin House Books.) When this book first came out in hardcover, I was actually so enamored of the beautiful cover art that I made a chalkboard sign inspired by it for our store display.

And the paperback version is just as gorgeous! The palette is very similar but with darker tones. Yet again I was inspired and this time, created a painting to evoke not only the loveliness of the cover but also the captivating, dark beauty of the story itself.

Have you read anything by Claire Fuller yet? If you haven’t, well then you simply must. I’m in cozy, nesting mode for winter right now – surrounded by introspective gray skies and moody, drizzly Pacific Northwest weather. Perfect weather, in fact, for reading Claire’s book ; filled with dark family secrets, the pain of the unfulfilled life, and some of the most lyrically breathtaking prose you’ll ever read.

Here’s a particularly resonant passage (page 265, paperback)

“The world had become harder, more abrasive; sheets scratched, clothes irritated, and people feared. It was when I was underwater or in the garden that I felt relief. But precise moments of grief, like the pangs of childbirth, are hard to recall after ththe most intense pain has passed: nature’s trick to ensure we survive and continue to reproduce.”

Wasn’t that just gorgeous? I’m not going to give anything away but if you like piecing things together, uncovering different perspectives of the same shared experience, and leaving a book wiser and more emotionally aware than you when you started reading it, then this is definitely the book for you.

“To slow down is to be taken into the soul of things.” – Terry Tempest Williams.

This new year, I resolve to take time off and go on more picnics!! But seriously, as I look back on the past few months, I realize what a blur they have been. As social a job as I have, I am, at heart, an introvert – and love nothing more than being cozy and quiet at home, curled up with something good to read or working on a craft project. Perhaps even spending a few hours by the water, watching the waves break and the ducks play. I love the outgoing parts of my life too but this year I’m prioritizing more quiet time as well. It’s important, not just for introverts, to slow down, turn off the constant noise we are all exposed to today, and recharge.

We let our phones recharge. Our batteries recharge. Parents impose routines and limits on their children to ensure that the kids get rest and don’t get burned out on the demands of life. Shouldn’t we give ourselves the same care as well?